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Aretha Franklin's youngest son files for control over her estate

Kecalf Franklin filed 2 court petitions Monday

(CNN) - A Michigan judge has been asked to decide whether one of Aretha Franklin's sons could take control of the late singer's estate and replace its current representative.

Kecalf Franklin, the singer's youngest son, filed two court petitions Monday seeking to be named a personal representative of his mother's estate.

He intends to be a co-representative of the estate along with Sabrina Owens -- who was appointed to that role last year -- and eventually replace her, according to court documents. Owens is Franklin's niece.

The singer's son claims Owens has "mismanaged the estate" and has "failed to perform a duty pertaining to office."

He says Owens didn't share an inventory of his mother's estate until about four months after the singer's death in August, according to the documents. A personal estate representative is expected to prepare an inventory of the decedent's proprty within 91 days after being appointed, according to Michigan state law.

The singer's son also alleges Owens has not discussed details about the investigation into the appraised value of Franklin's music catalog or negotiations for television series and a biopic based on his mother's life, the document states.

Attorneys for the estate said Monday "there is no basis to support the assumption" that Kecalf Franklin has the ability, skill or knowledge to act as the estate's representative, according to a court filing.

They also noted he is in "direct conflict" with other family members and Kecalf's requests are intended to "micro-manage the estate," the document states.

CNN has reached out to a spokeswoman for Franklin's estate.

The dispute comes as a judge is set to review the admissibility of one of three handwritten wills by the late singer.

After the wills were discovered in May by Owens, attorneys for Franklin's four sons were unable to resolve the issue and headed to court to determine if the wills are admissible to probate.

A handwriting expert has been hired to review the wills but the examination has not been completed.

CNN's Carma Hassan and Rebekah Riess contributed to this report.


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